Still in Bed

The process of forgetting Iraq has taken—and will continue to take—a great deal of effort and organization, since what is being forgotten involves a decade of mass violence and war crimes as experienced by millions of Iraqis and tens of thousands of Americans and others. A mere memory lapse could not perform this task, nor would a simple dose of repression. This kind of collective event involves a special kind of forgetting. Which is to say, it entails active forms of remembrance. To overwrite our memory, we need to supplant it with other images and stories. Vivid stories. Stories full of detail, adventure and heartbreak. Stories of life on the edge, stories about mortality and camaraderie. Stories so good that they override and outweigh lived experience and knowable facts. To forget is a profoundly creative process. Artistic, even. (Read more)

Reporters surround Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld as he holds a press conference while in flight to Kuwait on Dec. 6, 2004. [Source: Department of Defense via Wikimedia]

Reporters surround Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld as he holds a press conference while in flight to Kuwait on Dec. 6, 2004. [Source: Department of Defense via Wikimedia]